Miesha & Mimi

Miesha

Mimi

Female Himalayans

These last few weeks of a Corona del Mar resident’s life has been full of emotion. After loosing a mother and now a father moving into care facility, their beloved cats have needed to find refuge with Community Animal Network due to severe allergies.

“We hope to place the two beautiful female Himalayan cats Miesha and Mimi as a pair” says, DiAnna Pfaff-Martin who believes animals do grieve and it would be best not to separate the bonded pair.

FYI: Most municipal shelters (including Newport Beach ) will not take residents relinquished pets; forcing local animals to be turned over to the county shelter where over 50% of the animals loose their lives.

To help local animals in need; memo your check non-profit tax ID 33-0971560 and mail to Community Animal Network, P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA, 92658.


Bringing Your New Pet Home!

BRINGING YOUR CAT PET HOME

Topics:

A SHOPPING LIST FOR CAT OWNERS
VACCINE REACTIONS
SAVING MONEY ON KITTEN BOOSTER SHOTS
INTRODUCING THE NEW CAT TO OTHER FAMILY PETS
MAKING YOUR NEW CAT FEEL SAFE AT HOME
NATURAL HAIRBALL REMEDY
New! VACCINE GUIDELINES

HAZARDS AT HOME

HOW TO AVOID UNNECESSARY VET BILLS

Copyright The Animal Network of Orange County 2001

CATS AND KITTENS

Dangers may lurk inside your home for your cat or kitten. People often say to play with cats or kittens with string or ribbon… nothing could be more dangerous and costly if they swallow it. If you animal ingests the string or ribbon it could pass through without harm. But, often we see the string or ribbon hanging out of the rectum and pull creating the problem by severing the intestine, or it could cause a blockage and your animal would not be able to excrete.

The safest and wisest thing to do, is not to allow your animal to play with anything string-like.

Open doors slowly and shuffle your feet when you have a kitten in the house. See our rescue kitten “Buttlercup” that had a fractured pelvis and a compressed lumbar vertebrae from her foster daddy opening the bathroom door too fast. Buttercups intensive care giver was the founder of the organization. She can walk now but not without constant 24 hour round the clock care. Most people would not have been able to give the time, or would be willing to get up in the night every two to three hours. So, safety and prevention is a better way to yield caution.

MAKING YOUR NEW CAT FEEL SAFE AT HOME

FEELING SAFE – How To Make Your New Cat Feel At Home

The new cat needs to feel “safe”. Do not introduce household pets at this time.

Use an occupied bedroom. This room is called the “safe” room. You and your family are the “Safe-Keppers. C.A.N. does “not” suggest using the bathroom as it is cold and removed from the warmth of the family) Expect that your new cat may hide. Keep the bedroom door closed. Food, water and a litter is placed within easy reach of the hiding place. (Your new pet may not eat or come out for a few days.

Your new pet will come out when it feels safe. Give it time and lots of love and talk to your new animal. A good way to encourage your new pet to bond with you is to give it tasty canned food. (Just a teaspoon full) as a treat and encourage interactive play with a flashlight or laser pen both are exciting.

INTRODUCING The “NEW PET” To Other FAMILY PETS

Cats live in colonies in the wild and do get along with each other. Face to face meetings however only heighten anxiety, raise hair and encourage hisses and if too close howling growls and a swats. DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON! Animals get to know each other by smell. The best introductions fall after the new animal has “YOUR” smell! And the smell of your house.

In all of nature there is dominant and subordinate behavior. If dominant subordinate behaviors (one picking on the other) begin in your home they are very difficult to break.

A well planned introduction allows your new cat to feel at home, discourages dominant behavior. A happy home with multiple pets should be harmonious and everyone should be happy. The “feeling” of being safe is a very important to all animals’ happiness. DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON!

We suggest the “new” cat sleep in a family members room, not in a laundry room or spare room and not have the full run of the house. Since each household is different with activity and each animal takes it own time to feel comfortable, choosing the right time to introduce will be up to you and your instincts. But remember a week or more is not too long to be comfortable.

Step 1. Keep all animals separated. The two cats will be able to smell each other from under the door. More playful animals may in fact want to interact and will stick their paws under the door. (A great sign). If your original pet is growling and has a hissy attitude when walking by the door it is not time to introduce.
Step 2. When you think the time is right, put the new pet in a bathroom and let your original cat sniff the surroundings of the new animal. Later, do the same thing with the new one. (Let it sniff the other’s quarters) Still, no-nose-to-nose contact.

Step 3. Keep the new cat inside a carrier and let it be in the living areas with you to safeguard it and allow it to feel safe in an unfamiliar area. The animals may his or growl. If your original cat acts aggressive it is not the right time yet. The better your sense of timing and the less confrontational experiences the better for the introduction.

Step 4. NEVER ANY NOSE TO NOSE MEETINGS! After an adjustment period both cats should feel safe in each others presence if done properly with their feeling in mind. Have a spray water bottle and rolled up newspaper ready TO BREAK UP ANY SCUFFLES. Remember, feeling safe is key to all animal interaction and will build good relationship.

DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON!

A WEEK OR MORE IS NOT TOO LONG TO BE SEPARATED!

(C) Copywrite2002 – Introduction Procedure Developed By DiAnna Pfaff-Martin Founder Community Animal Network

LITTER BOX AND LITTER RECOMMENDATIONS

AVOID LITTER BOX ISSUES-Avoid Covered Litter Boxes For The First Week
Purchase one with high sides that is roomy. Avoid shallow pans as the animal can kick out a mess on your floor. At a hardware store , buy plastic carpet runner by the foot and place under the cat box (79 cents a foot, used in model homes to protect your carpet/floor and easy and easy quick roll up to clean). This will lessen need for sweeping or vacuuming.

NATURAL LITTER WE RECOMMEND

BEST Litter “SWHEAT SCOOP”, Natural Clumping Litter, Made Of Wheat! Clumps Naturally! No Odor! No Dust! Flushable! Septic Tank Safe! ·Buy 40lbs for Best Value at PetSmart. The crew is pleased to help, lift and help out. Just Ask.

GOOD, But Expensive! “WORLD’S BEST CAT LITTER” Natural Clumping Litter, Made of Corn!

BEST VALUE! “EXQUISITE CAT” PINE LITTER 20 lbs ONLY $8.49 At PetSmart *Your Cat Could Wee-Wee somewhere Else If You Don’t Read The Directions

READ DIRECTIONS ON BACK OF THE PACKAGE BEFORE USE!
Feline Pine· Natural Litter – Best Price Petsmart 20lbs for $ 9.99.

*READ DIRECTIONS ON BACK OF THE PACKAGE BEFORE USE!
Use only one inch of Feline Pine on the bottom of the litter pan and then To begin use cover lightly with sand litter/ let cats mix it up with use and then put less sand litter with each cleaning. Feline Pine is long lasting and has less odor. Turns to sawdust when used up. First time Users, follow the directions, we found not all cats will use it without some sand on top.
* PINE LITTER You Must Slowly get The Cat Used To it! Or It May Wee-Wee Somewhere Else!

FANCY PET FOOD DISHES
The “Network” founder’s cats eat from a silver-plated raised chafing dish with the Pyrex liner that was a fourth place golf trophy from the Los Angeles Country Club. Be creative to find a suitable vessel for your home. · Cats like running water, why not try a decorative waterfall?

FOR LITTER BOX ODOR CONTROL
Odors Away – Is not a mask, it actually eats the molecule odors. Available in liquid drops or spray) eats odor molecules. “The Network” likes the liquid drops. Available at Crown Ace Hardware. “The Network” places Odors Away in a ramekin (like what salsa is served in at a Mexican restaurant). We then place the ramekin inside a decorative pitcher or vase in the room where the litter box is so your animals can not drink it.

A SHOPPING LIST FOR CAT OWNERS

BUY AND USE PREMIUM PET FOODS (No, Whiskas, Nine Lives, Meow Mix)
We Recommend Pro-Plan Kitten and Cat Food (Highest Grade Of Purina with “More” Protein). For better brands purchase your pet food at a pet supply, not the grocery. Other good choices: Max Cat or Kitten, Science Diet, Iams, Nutro, Eukanuba. If you must shop at the market avoid purchasing pet food that you see advertised on television. Most have high fat content and fillers, it’s like feeding “Big Mac’s and French Fries” everyday! A better choice at the market level would be Iams.
AVOID MARKET BRANDS – use a lot of corn meal which is cheaper and may make animals skin itch and you think they have fleas OR your animal may develop a food allergy.

PURCHASE BEEF, CHICKEN, TURKEY & LIVER: AVOID SEAFOOD FLAVORS! Seafood is responsible for increased incidents of urinary infections in cats. These infections can be deadly in male cats! Research it! Absolutely NO Tuna!

CAT SCRATCHER- Buy 2 for either side of the litter box to cut down tracking!!!
Best For Size and Value – Pressed Cardboard Cat Scratcher …Saves Your Furniture. Comes with organic catnip. (Unobtrusive 18″ long X 2 ” high) could be just what you are looking for! BEST VALUE… Trader Joe’s

FURNITURE PROTECTORS
“Soft Paws” Brand name – Claw Covers that come in Red, Blue, Yellow and Pink that you can learn to put on. When your cat wears “Soft Paws” people think you painted their nails, but in fact they help protect your funriture and are ‘”fashionable”, too.
“Sticky Paws” Brand Name – Covers your furniture with clear plastic that adheres to edges where cats like the most. Use “Sticky Paws” while you are training your cat. Always have the pressed cardboard scratcher nearby to support and encourage positive behavior.

MICROCHIP
Microchips save lives. Protect your pet nation-wide from a life of uncertainty in the United States shelter system. Animal control officers scan for microchips when impounding all dogs and cats in the United States. A worthwhile investment. Our rescue animals are implanted with the Avid microchip and the registration is included with your adoption service fee. ($50.00 – $75.00 at most veterinarians).
COLLARS- Break Away Collar or Safe Cat (brand name)

TOYS
Furry mice – Cats love them and lose them under the fridge and sofa -Get lots of them.
“Cat Circle” hours of entertainment, a ball circles in donut shape plastic runner. No need to spend on the fancy ones. The one with the mouse inside breaks easily and the one with the scratching carpet in the middle most cats don’t use. If you purchase the large size the cats lay in the middle and bat around, Too cute!
Flashlight or Laser pen– Tire your animals out before bedtime!

(c) 2006 The Animal Network

SAVING MONEY ON BOOSTER SHOTS

“FIP” or “Rabies” vaccines are not recommended for indoor cats as it is unlikely they will be exposed to these. Unless your kitten is sick, there is really no need to see a veterinarian when you get booster shots for your kitten. Many vets offer vaccine clinics, which offer the shots at a significantly lower rate – so don’t forget to ask.

CANNED PUMPKIN IS NATURAL HAIRBALL REMEDY

A simple holistic remedy for constipation that we like to recommend be used to flush the body of hairballs and stomach acid is canned pumpkin. Mix pumpkin with equal parts of “canned” kitten, or cat food once a week as a hairball remedy. Pumpkin may be used after adoption to rid your new pet of stomach acid from the stress of adoption day, a new environment, or a diet change.

Other reasons for diarrhea that require treatment are worms, or a bacterial infection. Your kitten has been wormed for roundworms, tapeworms and hookworms. However, veterinarians recommend a second treatment.

Purchase plain canned pumpkin (not the pie mix). To freeze for easy weekly distribution in 2-teaspoon portions: Disperse 2 teaspoons of canned pumpkin onto strips of saran wrap and twist them closed. (like wrapping candy) Place the dollops of saran wrapped pumpkin in a large baggy and store in the freezer. Each week remove one dollop of saran wrapped pumpkin, thaw and mix it with canned food for a morning and night feeding once a week.

FAST FACTS

FELINE VACCINE GUIDELINES

The American Association of Feline Practitioners has created guidelines for vaccinating cats. A vaccine protocol should be based on your cat’s individual risks of exposure, and every cat does not need every vaccine every year. Vaccines can cause adverse reactions in certain animals and a very small percentage of cats develop tumors at sites of vaccines, so discuss your cat’s needs with your veterinarian. Even if your cat does not need a vaccine every year, an annual physical exam is needed to monitor the pet’s health and provide you with an opportunity to discuss any problems.

FELINE VACCINES

Elaine Wexler-Mitchell, DVM of The Cat Care Clinic in Orange and author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to a Healthy Cat”and Guide To A Healthy Cat, Howell Book House © 2004 recommends initial vaccines for kittens at 6-8 weeks of age. Kitten vaccines are repeated every 21-30 days until the kitten is at least 12 weeks old. (See your newly adopted kitten’s health record for scheduling.) Your kitten will not be fully vaccinated until your series is completed.

FVRCP VACCINE

This vaccine prevents Panleukopenia (kitty distemper, also know as kitty parvo) and lessens the severity of the cold viruses: rhinotraceitis (feline herpes) and calici virus. Dr. Wexler-Mitchell recommends the FRCP booster vaccine be given to both indoor and outdoor adult cats one year after finishing their kitten series and then once every three years. Protection provided by this vaccine has been shown to last at least three years.

FELV VACCINE

(Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine)

Feline specialist, Elaine Wexler-Mitchell, DVM recommends blood testing all cats for FeLV and if negative, vaccinating kittens at 9-12 weeks, then one month later. Vaccination can be discontinued if the cat remains strictly indoors in the future.

OTHER SUGGESTIONS

The FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis) intranasal vaccine is not recommended routinely for any cats.

The rabies vaccine is recommended for any kittens or cats that go outdoors, where they could be exposed to wild animals carrying the virus) or have a tendency to bite humans. Rabies vaccination is currently not required by law for cats in Orange County .

Community Animal Network rescue cats and kittens have been blood tested for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses by a laboratory. If a cat could have had a recent exposure to either virus, a repeat test is recommended 4-6 weeks afterwards. (False negatives with the veterinary in-house testing almost never happen, but false positives can occur more frequently and should be confirmed with a laboratory test.)

VACCINE REACTIONS

However rare, they do occur. Symptoms can last 24 up to 48 hours. Mild reactions of lethargy and loss of appetite and tenderness at the injection site are the most common. More serious reaction symptoms could be vomiting, diarrhea, trembling, difficulty breathing and should be seen by a veterinarian.

Compliments Of : Community Animal Network & Cat Care Clinic Of Orange

Best Diagnostic Veterinarian In O.C.: Dr. Elaine Wexler-Mitchell : (714)-282-2287

The Author Of: Guide To A Healthy Cat

Howell Book House © 2004 available on www.amazon.com


Meet Tiffany

LAP CATS

Community Animal Network has quite a number of fabulous lap cats to choose from lately. Most lap cats personalities are highly desired as they are calm lounge lizards that usually have good house manners. People seeking these qualities should really consider adopting animals over eight years old as they are just perfect for those who want a really loving cat.

Tiffany is a large affectionate tabby lap cat. She is the kind of cat that would make a great companion for a senior person or anyone that desires an exceptional animal with good house manners. Like a good wine it is enhanced by age…Tiffany is thirteen and currently lives with a dog and other cats.

People often overlook qualities and choose an animal by its’ color, sex and age. When it comes down to getting the right pet choose the animal that has the best qualities for your home life. If you have a dog find an adult animal that currently lives with a dog.

Make a difference in an animal’s life; adopt an adult or senior pet. It’s life-saving!

If you would like to give your support to our work; memo your tax-deductible donation; “Rescue Operations”, tax ID 33-0971560 and mail to Community Animal Network, P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA, 92658.

Two other available twelve year olds are the solid grey Russian Blue-look named Shamus and a gorgeous long hair black cat named Branford.

Our senior cats have been well cared for and come with a 30 day health guarantee. Veterinarians carefully examine and read their blood panels to confirm every organ is functioning properly. Community Animal Network even cleans their teeth if necessary. We welcome you to explore the idea of adopting great mature cats!


Save Lives | Adopt Rabbits

Rabbits

PLEASE SAVE LIVES!

Adopt Adult Rabbits!

Please support responsible citizens in helping place their pets in new homes and cut this endless cycle of rabbit abandonment at parks! And shelter rabbits lose their lives quickly as they chew up everything and the cage mats.

Local Rabbit Adoption

Catnip and Carrots

Huntington Beach

Irvine Animal Care Center Has A Farm Animal Section!

Irvine Animal Care Center

6443 Oak Canyon (at Sand Canyon)

Irvine

CA 92620-4202

www.irvineshelter.org

Telephone: 949.724.7741

Hours:
Monday 10:00am – 5:00pm
Tuesday CLOSED
Wednesday 10:00am – 7:00pm
Thursday 10:00am – 5:00pm
Friday 10:00am – 5:00pm
Saturday 10:00am – 5:00pm
Sunday 12:00pm – 4:00pm

Dear Kids and Parents,

There are lots of rabbits in shelters who need good homes. Every child wants a bunny at one time or another because they are so cute. Children can often lose interest in rabbits because they don’t respond to humans in the same way that kittens and puppies do. Parents need to be ready to be the caretaker when that happens?

Rabbits can be wonderful, charming family members if parents and children educate themselves first. Caring for a rabbit is not like caring for a dog or cat. They are very social, and need lots of interaction with humans. They do not thrive when left in a hutch in the backyard.

A good source for rabbit information is www.rabbit.org or The House Rabbit Handbook. Let learning about rabbits before you buy be a family project.

Your furry friend,

Thumper

Always Spay and Neuter Rabbits!
Neuter A Male Rabbit Spay Female Rabbits Animal Medical Center

714.531.1155

Fountain Valley, CA

$45.00 $75.00 Animal Medical Center

714.531.1155

Fountain Valley, CA

LIST Your RABBIT For Adoption

[email protected]

Please remember to give us your contact details..

$ 10.00 donation For 6 month

Pre-Loved Rabbits Need Homes

Breed

Color

Description

Profile/ History

Pet’s Name

Contact

List Your Rabbit Here To Get A New Home! The Network 949.759.3646


Daisy and Riesling

Daisy and Riesling were 8 week old torti tabby kittens. They were born with eyelid agenesis which is the incomplete formation of the eyelid. Their lashes rubbed on the surface of their eyes which caused corneal edema from the lashes rubbing. We had to act quickly to save their eyesight and stop any corneal ulcerations. A second surgery was needed and performed to perfect the correction of the lid.

The surgery was not cosmetic; it was essential to safeguard their vision and stop the irritation and pain of their lashes rubbing on the surface of their eyes.

Community Animal Network does not kill animals that become too expensive, nor does it restrict an animal from being rescued and adopted into a loving home because of the cost.


Pet Highlights

Network Animals Are Published Every Wednesday In The Los Angeles Times

Local Daily Pilot in Newport Beach and Costa Mesa, California

See A Special Cat?
E-Mail
[email protected]

See A Special Dog?
E-Mail
[email protected]

Your donation is needed in order for us to continue our ministry to local animals. It is always necessary to ask for volunteers and donations to continue our rescue efforts.

Rescuing animals is a full time job…

Please help memo your check non-profit tax ID 33-0971560 and mail to Community Animal Network, P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA, 92658.

Interested?
E-Mail [email protected]

NOAH
FIV Positive
Snow Shoe Siamese Ragdoll Mix

I Found Someone That Loves “ME”!

“Noah” the beautiful blue-eyed Siamese Snowshoe Ragdoll mix still needs a home. Noah has blossomed and is looking extremely beautiful since his rescue from the Newport back bay when he was found very thin and treated for bite wounds and tested positive for FIV (Feline Immunodeficiency Virus). He’s extremely affectionate and is seeking a home where he can be the only cat to love you.

JAKE FOUND A NEW HOME!

JAKE

Jake is a large well-trained Lab Ridgeback Mix who is now 6 ½ years old. Jake’s been part of the Fischer family since he was only a year old and the family is heart broken to give him up, but their three year old son’s allergies are worsening with time. Jake is great with other dogs both large and small and is friendly and mellow and good around kids. Jake is said to be a great family dog who needs a new home without cats.

Jake

Lab Ridgeback Mix

“TIFFANY”

LAP CATS
Community Animal Network has quite a number of fabulous lap cats to choose from lately. Most lap cats personalities are highly desired as they are calm lounge lizards that usually have good house manners. People seeking these qualities should really consider adopting animals over eight years old as they are just perfect for those who want a really loving cat.
Tiffany is a large affectionate tabby lap cat. She is the kind of cat that would make a great companion for a senior person or anyone that desires an exceptional animal with good house manners. Like a good wine it is enhanced by age…Tiffany is thirteen and currently lives with a dog and other cats.

People often overlook qualities and choose an animal by its’ color, sex and age. When it comes down to getting the right pet choose the animal that has the best qualities for your home life. If you have a dog find an adult animal that currently lives with a dog.

Make a difference in an animal’s life; adopt an adult or senior pet. It’s life-saving!

If you would like to give your support to our work; memo your tax-deductible donation; “Rescue Operations”, tax ID 33-0971560 and mail to Community Animal Network, P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA, 92658.

Two other available twelve year olds are the solid grey Russian Blue-look named Shamus and a gorgeous long hair black cat named Branford.

Our senior cats have been well cared for and come with a 30 day health guarantee. Veterinarians carefully examine and read their blood panels to confirm every organ is functioning properly. Community Animal Network even cleans their teeth if necessary. We welcome you to explore the idea of adopting great mature cats!
WE FOUND A NEW HOME TOGETHER

Silver Persian Mixes

“Coco & Healy”

Two long hair silver grey Persian mix sisters were adopted as kittens from our Network in August 2004 and now need new homes because their family is moving back to England permanently. Two weeks remain before the family is leaving for the UK and we need someone to step up and help these two by fostering them or adopting the two.

Many countries still enforce a very strong quarantine and England ’s is said to be avoided as some don’t survive illnesses caught while in there. This time of year, it takes over 90 days to find a new home for an adult cat as people are focusing on the tiny ones. Adult cats are dying for your help! Please help save lives adopt a cat not a kitten.

See animals on our website www.animalnetwork.org or at Fashion Island every weekend from 12 noon – 4:00pm. Or help by donating to “feed the kittens”; memo your check non-profit tax ID 33-0971560 and mail to Community Animal Network, P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA, 92658.

ALL FOUND HOMES

SPRING KITTENS

Kimba, Gatina, Felix and Toulouse were only two and a half weeks old when they were rescued and transferred along with their mom Duchess to a Community Animal Network foster home. Duchess’s kitten family is now seven and a half weeks old and is just the beginning of the dreaded Spring kitten season which will consume much of the organizations funds to feed and maintain their vet medical needs.

Twenty-five dollars will buy enough kitten formula to feed four abandoned babies for a week. Kittens need round the clock feedings until four weeks old and most babies wean between six and seven weeks old. Volunteers are needed and the supplies and vet services are provided by Community Animal Network. You may be surprised that quiet bottle feeders may be welcome at animal friendly businesses, so why not ask your boss if you could help?

At this time, we have a total of nine pregnant cats, four nursing moms and a litter of newborns that are being bottle fed. If you come across kittens in your bushes please don’t take them until you are sure the mom was not just searching for food. The need is greater than we have volunteers so please consider calling 949.533.0411 to help. Donations graciously accepted to help feed the kitties this Spring.
I FOUND A HOME

GULLIVER

Gulliver is a long hair sable cat who was one of the lucky ones pulled from the shelter’s undiscerning death row. Gulliver has qualities of a Main Coon; a large size, tuffs of hair in the ears and between the toes and a friendly personality. He was named after Gulliver’s Travels, kneads his paws at the sound of a soft voice and is very affectionate. For anyone liking that Main Coon size, we will have four “super size” cats this weekend for adoption and for those who fancy Siamese we will have two.

You can help bring lost animals home by supporting the microchip identification system and having your dog or cat implanted and then registered in the national database. Gulliver is now protected by the tiny chip which will alert his new pet parents and the rescue organization if he was ever to need help again. Watch for information about our “Community Microchip Implant Event” that is coming soon.

In order to save more lives please consider getting your lonely cat a friend! Do not get a kitten; adopt adult cats of similar age and energy levels. We have a thirty minute “Pet Parenting Class” in which we addresses how to introduce adult cats.

WE FOUND A HOME
Two six month old tabby brothers Bill and George were rescued from an RV park. George is a long hair tabby that everyone thinks looks like a Main Coon cat and his brother George is a beautiful golden tabby, similar to the golden leopard Bengal cat. A neighbor called us after discovering Bill and George along with their sister inside a box secured with a brick on top. High anxiety and stress was apparent as the two male kittens suffered minor scratches after being locked in side the box with their sister Rosemary who was in heat.

Volunteer journalists are being welcomed for our new on-line magazine “The Animal Report”. A photo journalist intern from California State University Fullerton will be researching the cultural and socio-economic perception of peoples and present a photographic interpretation of the issues that may cause animal abuse and abandonment in America .

Always spay, neuter, microchip, collar and tag your pets.


Tasha’s Story

Story Featured – August 25, 2009

A rescue call grabbed attention when a mother claimed that her 11-year-old daughter would not keep the litter box clean. The daughter’s punishment was going to be sending Tasha and her kittens to the shelter if Community Animal Network would not take them.

The beautiful silver-gray Russian blue Tasha and her kittens were lucky that the Ronaldson family of Newport Beach happened to call asking to foster animals in their home on that particular day.


Bill & George



Bill



George

Two six month old tabby brothers Bill and George were rescued from an RV park. George is a long hair tabby that everyone thinks looks like a Main Coon cat and his brother George is a beautiful golden tabby, similar to the golden leopard Bengal cat. A neighbor called us after discovering Bill and George along with their sister inside a box secured with a brick on top. High anxiety and stress was apparent as the two male kittens suffered minor scratches after being locked in side the box with their sister Rosemary who was in heat.


Gulliver

Gulliver is a long hair sable cat who was one of the lucky ones pulled from the shelter’s undiscerning death row. Gulliver has qualities of a Main Coon; a large size, tuffs of hair in the ears and between the toes and a friendly personality. He was named after Gulliver’s Travels, kneads his paws at the sound of a soft voice and is very affectionate. For anyone liking that Main Coon size, we will have four “super size” cats this weekend for adoption and for those who fancy Siamese we will have two.

You can help bring lost animals home by supporting the microchip identification system and having your dog or cat implanted and then registered in the national database. Gulliver is now protected by the tiny chip which will alert his new pet parents and the rescue organization if he was ever to need help again. Watch for information about our “Community Microchip Implant Event” that is coming soon.

In order to save more lives please consider getting your lonely cat a friend! Do not get a kitten; adopt adult cats of similar age and energy levels. We have a thirty minute “Pet Parenting Class” in which we addresses how to introduce adult cats.


Bringing Your Cat Home

HAZARDS AT HOME
HOW TO AVOID UNNECESSARY VET BILLS
Copyright The Animal Network of Orange County 2001

CATS AND KITTENS

Dangers may lurk inside your home for your cat or kitten. People often say to play with cats or kittens with string or ribbon… nothing could be more dangerous and costly if they swallow it. If you animal ingests the string or ribbon it could pass through without harm. But, often we see the string or ribbon hanging out of the rectum and pull creating the problem by severing the intestine, or it could cause a blockage and your animal would not be able to excrete.

The safest and wisest thing to do, is not to allow your animal to play with anything string-like.

Open doors slowly and shuffle your feet when you have a kitten in the house. See our rescue kitten “Buttlercup” that had a fractured pelvis and a compressed lumbar vertebrae from her foster daddy opening the bathroom door too fast. Buttercups intensive care giver was the founder of the organization. She can walk now but not without constant 24 hour round the clock care. Most people would not have been able to give the time, or would be willing to get up in the night every two to three hours. So, safety and prevention is a better way to yield caution.

MAKING YOUR NEW CAT FEEL SAFE AT HOME

FEELING SAFE – How To Make Your New Cat Feel At Home

The new cat needs to feel “safe”. Do not introduce household pets at this time.

Use an occupied bedroom. This room is called the “safe” room. You and your family are the “Safe-Keppers. C.A.N. does “not” suggest using the bathroom as it is cold and removed from the warmth of the family) Expect that your new cat may hide. Keep the bedroom door closed. Food, water and a litter is placed within easy reach of the hiding place. (Your new pet may not eat or come out for a few days.

Your new pet will come out when it feels safe. Give it time and lots of love and talk to your new animal. A good way to encourage your new pet to bond with you is to give it tasty canned food. (Just a teaspoon full) as a treat and encourage interactive play with a flashlight or laser pen both are exciting.

INTRODUCING The “NEW PET” To Other FAMILY PETS

Cats live in colonies in the wild and do get along with each other. Face to face meetings however only heighten anxiety, raise hair and encourage hisses and if too close howling growls and a swats. DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON! Animals get to know each other by smell. The best introductions fall after the new animal has “YOUR” smell! And the smell of your house.

In all of nature there is dominant and subordinate behavior. If dominant subordinate behaviors (one picking on the other) begin in your home they are very difficult to break.

A well planned introduction allows your new cat to feel at home, discourages dominant behavior. A happy home with multiple pets should be harmonious and everyone should be happy. The “feeling” of being safe is a very important to all animals’ happiness. DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON!

We suggest the “new” cat sleep in a family members room, not in a laundry room or spare room and not have the full run of the house. Since each household is different with activity and each animal takes it own time to feel comfortable, choosing the right time to introduce will be up to you and your instincts. But remember a week or more is not too long to be comfortable.

Step 1. Keep all animals separated. The two cats will be able to smell each other from under the door. More playful animals may in fact want to interact and will stick their paws under the door. (A great sign). If your original pet is growling and has a hissy attitude when walking by the door it is not time to introduce. Step 2. When you think the time is right, put the new pet in a bathroom and let your original cat sniff the surroundings of the new animal. Later, do the same thing with the new one. (Let it sniff the other’s quarters) Still, no-nose-to-nose contact.

Step 3. Keep the new cat inside a carrier and let it be in the living areas with you to safeguard it and allow it to feel safe in an unfamiliar area. The animals may his or growl. If your original cat acts aggressive it is not the right time yet. The better your sense of timing and the less confrontational experiences the better for the introduction.

Step 4. NEVER ANY NOSE TO NOSE MEETINGS! After an adjustment period both cats should feel safe in each others presence if done properly with their feeling in mind. Have a spray water bottle and rolled up newspaper ready TO BREAK UP ANY SCUFFLES. Remember, feeling safe is key to all animal interaction and will build good relationship.

DO NOT INTRODUCE TOO SOON! A WEEK OR MORE IS NOT TOO LONG TO BE SEPARATED!

© 2002 – Introduction Procedure Developed By DiAnna Pfaff-Martin Founder Community Animal Network

LITTER BOX AND LITTER RECOMMENDATIONS

AVOID LITTER BOX ISSUES
Avoid covered litter boxes For the first week, purchase one with high sides that is roomy. Avoid shallow pans as the animal can kick out a mess on your floor. At a hardware store, buy plastic carpet runner by the foot and place under the cat box (79 cents a foot, used in model homes to protect your carpet/floor and easy and easy quick roll up to clean). This will lessen need for sweeping or vacuuming.

NATURAL LITTER WE RECOMMEND

BEST Litter “SWHEAT SCOOP”, Natural Clumping Litter, Made Of Wheat! Clumps Naturally! No Odor! No Dust! Flushable! Septic Tank Safe! Buy 40lbs for Best Value at PetSmart. The crew is pleased to help, lift and help out. Just Ask.

GOOD, But Expensive! “WORLD’S BEST CAT LITTER” Natural Clumping Litter, Made of Corn!

BEST VALUE! “EXQUISITE CAT” PINE LITTER 20 lbs ONLY $8.49 At PetSmart *Your Cat Could Wee-Wee somewhere Else If You Don’t Read The Directions

READ DIRECTIONS ON BACK OF THE PACKAGE BEFORE USE!
Feline Pine· Natural Litter – Best Price Petsmart 20lbs for $ 9.99.

*READ DIRECTIONS ON BACK OF THE PACKAGE BEFORE USE! Use only one inch of Feline Pine on the bottom of the litter pan and then To begin use cover lightly with sand litter/ let cats mix it up with use and then put less sand litter with each cleaning. Feline Pine is long lasting and has less odor. Turns to sawdust when used up. First time Users, follow the directions, we found not all cats will use it without some sand on top.
* PINE LITTER You Must Slowly get The Cat Used To it! Or It May Wee-Wee Somewhere Else!

FANCY PET FOOD DISHES
The “Network” founder’s cats eat from a silver-plated raised chafing dish with the Pyrex liner that was a fourth place golf trophy from the Los Angeles Country Club. Be creative to find a suitable vessel for your home. · Cats like running water, why not try a decorative waterfall?

FOR LITTER BOX ODOR CONTROL
Odors Away – Is not a mask, it actually eats the molecule odors. Available in liquid drops or spray) eats odor molecules. “The Network” likes the liquid drops. Available at Crown Ace Hardware. “The Network” places Odors Away in a ramekin (like what salsa is served in at a Mexican restaurant). We then place the ramekin inside a decorative pitcher or vase in the room where the litter box is so your animals can not drink it.

A SHOPPING LIST FOR CAT OWNERS

BUY AND USE PREMIUM PET FOODS (No, Whiskas, Nine Lives, Meow Mix)
We Recommend Pro-Plan Kitten and Cat Food (Highest Grade Of Purina with “More” Protein). For better brands purchase your pet food at a pet supply, not the grocery. Other good choices: Max Cat or Kitten, Science Diet, Iams, Nutro, Eukanuba. If you must shop at the market avoid purchasing pet food that you see advertised on television. Most have high fat content and fillers, it’s like feeding “Big Mac’s and French Fries” everyday! A better choice at the market level would be Iams.
AVOID MARKET BRANDS – use a lot of corn meal which is cheaper and may make animals skin itch and you think they have fleas OR your animal may develop a food allergy.

PURCHASE BEEF, CHICKEN, TURKEY & LIVER: AVOID SEAFOOD FLAVORS! Seafood is responsible for increased incidents of urinary infections in cats. These infections can be deadly in male cats! Research it! Absolutely NO Tuna!

CAT SCRATCHER- Buy 2 for either side of the litter box to cut down tracking!!!
Best For Size and Value – Pressed Cardboard Cat Scratcher …Saves Your Furniture. Comes with organic catnip. (Unobtrusive 18″ long X 2 ” high) could be just what you are looking for! BEST VALUE… Trader Joe’s

FURNITURE PROTECTORS
“Soft Paws” Brand name – Claw Covers that come in Red, Blue, Yellow and Pink that you can learn to put on. When your cat wears “Soft Paws” people think you painted their nails, but in fact they help protect your funriture and are ‘”fashionable”, too. “Sticky Paws” Brand Name – Covers your furniture with clear plastic that adheres to edges where cats like the most. Use “Sticky Paws” while you are training your cat. Always have the pressed cardboard scratcher nearby to support and encourage positive behavior.

MICROCHIP
Microchips save lives. Protect your pet nation-wide from a life of uncertainty in the United States shelter system. Animal control officers scan for microchips when impounding all dogs and cats in the United States. A worthwhile investment. Our rescue animals are implanted with the Avid microchip and the registration is included with your adoption service fee. ($50.00 – $75.00 at most veterinarians).
COLLARS- Break Away Collar or Safe Cat (brand name)

TOYS
Furry mice – Cats love them and lose them under the fridge and sofa -Get lots of them.
“Cat Circle” hours of entertainment, a ball circles in donut shape plastic runner. No need to spend on the fancy ones. The one with the mouse inside breaks easily and the one with the scratching carpet in the middle most cats don’t use. If you purchase the large size the cats lay in the middle and bat around, Too cute! Flashlight or Laser pen– Tire your animals out before bedtime!

© 2006 The Animal Network

SAVING MONEY ON BOOSTER SHOTS

“FIP” or “Rabies” vaccines are not recommended for indoor cats as it is unlikely they will be exposed to these. Unless your kitten is sick, there is really no need to see a veterinarian when you get booster shots for your kitten. Many vets offer vaccine clinics, which offer the shots at a significantly lower rate – so don’t forget to ask.

CANNED PUMPKIN IS NATURAL HAIRBALL REMEDY

A simple holistic remedy for constipation that we like to recommend be used to flush the body of hairballs and stomach acid is canned pumpkin. Mix pumpkin with equal parts of “canned” kitten, or cat food once a week as a hairball remedy. Pumpkin may be used after adoption to rid your new pet of stomach acid from the stress of adoption day, a new environment, or a diet change.

Other reasons for diarrhea that require treatment are worms, or a bacterial infection. Your kitten has been wormed for roundworms, tapeworms and hookworms. However, veterinarians recommend a second treatment.

Purchase plain canned pumpkin (not the pie mix). To freeze for easy weekly distribution in 2-teaspoon portions: Disperse 2 teaspoons of canned pumpkin onto strips of saran wrap and twist them closed. (like wrapping candy) Place the dollops of saran wrapped pumpkin in a large baggy and store in the freezer. Each week remove one dollop of saran wrapped pumpkin, thaw and mix it with canned food for a morning and night feeding once a week.

FAST FACTS
FELINE VACCINE GUIDELINES

The American Association of Feline Practitioners has created guidelines for vaccinating cats. A vaccine protocol should be based on your cat’s individual risks of exposure, and every cat does not need every vaccine every year. Vaccines can cause adverse reactions in certain animals and a very small percentage of cats develop tumors at sites of vaccines, so discuss your cat’s needs with your veterinarian. Even if your cat does not need a vaccine every year, an annual physical exam is needed to monitor the pet’s health and provide you with an opportunity to discuss any problems.
FELINE VACCINES

Elaine Wexler-Mitchell, DVM of The Cat Care Clinic in Orange and author of “The Complete Idiot’s Guide to a Healthy Cat”and Guide To A Healthy Cat, Howell Book House © 2004 recommends initial vaccines for kittens at 6-8 weeks of age. Kitten vaccines are repeated every 21-30 days until the kitten is at least 12 weeks old. (See your newly adopted kitten’s health record for scheduling.) Your kitten will not be fully vaccinated until your series is completed.
FVRCP VACCINE

This vaccine prevents Panleukopenia (kitty distemper, also know as kitty parvo) and lessens the severity of the cold viruses: rhinotraceitis (feline herpes) and calici virus. Dr. Wexler-Mitchell recommends the FRCP booster vaccine be given to both indoor and outdoor adult cats one year after finishing their kitten series and then once every three years. Protection provided by this vaccine has been shown to last at least three years.
FELV VACCINE

(Feline Leukemia Virus Vaccine)

Feline specialist, Elaine Wexler-Mitchell, DVM recommends blood testing all cats for FeLV and if negative, vaccinating kittens at 9-12 weeks, then one month later. Vaccination can be discontinued if the cat remains strictly indoors in the future.
OTHER SUGGESTIONS

The FIP (Feline Infectious Peritonitis) intranasal vaccine is not recommended routinely for any cats.

The rabies vaccine is recommended for any kittens or cats that go outdoors, where they could be exposed to wild animals carrying the virus) or have a tendency to bite humans. Rabies vaccination is currently not required by law for cats in Orange County .

Community Animal Network rescue cats and kittens have been blood tested for Feline Leukemia and Feline Immunodeficiency Viruses by a laboratory. If a cat could have had a recent exposure to either virus, a repeat test is recommended 4-6 weeks afterwards. (False negatives with the veterinary in-house testing almost never happen, but false positives can occur more frequently and should be confirmed with a laboratory test.)
VACCINE REACTIONS

However rare, they do occur. Symptoms can last 24 up to 48 hours. Mild reactions of lethargy and loss of appetite and tenderness at the injection site are the most common. More serious reaction symptoms could be vomiting, diarrhea, trembling, difficulty breathing and should be seen by a veterinarian.

Compliments Of : Community Animal Network & Cat Care Clinic Of Orange

Best Diagnostic Veterinarian In O.C.: Dr. Elaine Wexler-Mitchell : (714) 282-2287

The Author Of: Guide To A Healthy Cat

Howell Book House © 2004 available on www.amazon.com